Posts for: June, 2021

AreYourTeethSensitivetoWhiteninglikeDrewBarrymoresHeresWhatYouCanDo

Best known for her roles in E.T. and Ever After, and more recently as a suburban mom/zombie on Netflix's Santa Clarita Diet, Drew Barrymore is now bringing her trademark quirky optimism to a new talk show, The Drew Barrymore Show on CBS. Her characteristic self-deprecating humor was also on display recently on Instagram, as she showed viewers how she keeps her teeth clean and looking great.

In typical Drew fashion, she invited viewers into her bathroom to witness her morning brushing ritual (complete with slurps and sloshes). She also let everyone in on a little insider Drew 411: She has extremely sensitive teeth, so although she would love to sport a Hollywood smile, this condition makes teeth whitening difficult.

Barrymore's sensitivity problem isn't unique. For some, bleaching agents can irritate the gums and tooth roots. It's usually a mild reaction that subsides in a day or two. But take heart if you count yourself among the tooth-sensitive: Professional whitening in the dental office may provide the solution you are looking for.

In the dental office, we take your specific needs into account when we treat you. We have more control over our bleaching solutions than those you may find in the store, allowing us to adjust the strength to match your dental needs and your smile expectations and we can monitor you during treatment to keep your teeth safe. Furthermore, professional whitening lasts longer, so you won't have to repeat it as often.

After treatment, you can minimize discomfort from sensitive teeth by avoiding hot or cold foods and beverages. You may also find it helpful to use a toothpaste or other hygiene product designed to reduce tooth sensitivity.

The best thing you can do is to schedule an appointment with us to fully explore your problems with sensitivity and how we may help. First and foremost, you should undergo an exam to ensure any sensitivity you're experiencing isn't related to a more serious issue like tooth decay or gum recession.

Having a bright smile isn't just advantageous to celebrities like Drew Barrymore—it can make a difference in your personal and professional relationships, as well as your own self-confidence. We can help you achieve that brighter smile while helping you avoid sensitivity afterward.

If you would like more information about teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Important Teeth Whitening Questions Answered.”


By Premier Dental Care
June 17, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: saliva  
These3TasksShowHowSalivaisAmazing

Saliva probably doesn’t rate high on your amazement meter. You’re more likely to notice its absence and the dry irritation that results.

But you might be more impressed with this unsung bodily fluid if you knew all the things it does. It’s definitely a multi-tasker, performing a number of jobs (including aiding in digestion) that not only keep your oral health on track, but your general well-being too. And there are even new testing methods where saliva may even tell us when you’re not doing so well.

Here are 3 more tasks your saliva is doing for your mouth right now that truly makes it amazing.

Cleansing. Your teeth’s chewing action shreds food so it’s easier to digest. But that also leaves behind tiny particles in your mouth. Bacteria feast on these particles (especially carbohydrates like sugar) and produce acid as a byproduct, which can increase your risk of tooth decay. Saliva serves as a kind of “rinse cycle” for your mouth, helping to wash a good bit of these errant particles down your throat and away from hungry bacteria.

Defense. Speaking of bacteria, your mouth is home to millions of them. While most are harmless or even beneficial, a fraction can harm your teeth and gums. Saliva is your first line of defense, emitting an antibody known as Immunoglobulin A that targets these bacteria. Saliva also produces an antibacterial substance called lyzozyme that prevents bacteria from growing.

Enamel Protection. Although it’s the strongest substance in the body, your teeth’s enamel can’t withstand the effects of mouth acid, the by-product of bacterial feeding and growth. Acid levels naturally rise after eating; but even this sudden rise can begin the process of demineralization where minerals in enamel dissolve. Saliva saves the day by first neutralizing the acid and restoring the mouth’s normal pH in about thirty minutes to an hour. It also helps restore minerals in enamel, a process called remineralization. It’s all in a day’s work for this remarkable fluid.

If you would like more information on the importance of saliva to oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Saliva: How it is used to Diagnose Disease.”


By Premier Dental Care
June 07, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
GumDiseaseCouldImpactMoreThanYourOralHealth

Preventing periodontal (gum) disease not only preserves your teeth and gums, it might also benefit the rest of your health. There's growing evidence that gum disease has links to other systemic diseases.

Gum disease usually starts with dental plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles, which triggers a bacterial gum infection. Left untreated, the infection advances and steadily breaks down the gums' attachment to teeth.

This can create large ulcerated areas that are too weak to prevent the passing of bacteria and toxins into the bloodstream and other parts of the body. There's growing evidence from epidemiology (the study of the spread and control of disease) that this bloodstream transfer, as well as the inflammation that accompanies gum disease, could affect other body-wide conditions or diseases.

Diabetes. This chronic condition occurs when the body can't adequately produce insulin, a hormone that regulates sugar (glucose) in the blood, or can't respond to it. Diabetes can inhibit healing, cause blindness or lead to death. Both diabetes and gum disease are inflammatory in nature, and there's some evidence inflammation arising from either condition may worsen the other.

Heart disease. Heart attack, congestive heart failure, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death. Like diabetes and gum disease, these heart-related conditions are also characterized by inflammation. There are also specific types of bacteria that arise from gum disease that can travel through the body and increase the risk of heart disease.

Arthritis. An autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis causes debilitating pain, particularly involving the joints, and leads to decreased mobility. Interestingly, many newly diagnosed arthritis patients are also found to have some form of periodontal disease—the two diseases, in fact, follow a similar development track. Although this may hint of a connection, we need more research to determine if there are indeed links between the two diseases.

Regardless of any direct relationships between gum disease and other conditions, preventing and treating it can improve both your oral and general health. You can lower your risk of gum disease by practicing daily brushing and flossing and undergoing regular dental cleanings to remove plaque. And at the first sign of gum problems, see your dentist as soon as possible for early intervention—the earlier the better.

If you would like more information on oral health care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”




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Premier Dental Care

(603) 464-5580
64 Myrtle St Hillsboro, NH 03244